Press Release

Grand News Network | October 24, 2023

Europe's High: UK Parents Need NHS Help For Daughter's Seizures, THC MMJ Flowers In Switzerland & More

Luxembourg: Medical Marijuana Shortage Due To Supplier Change

The medical marijuana program in Luxembourg launched in Feb 2019 and has since dealt with supply shortages. The current lack of medical marijuana (MMJ) products is attributed to the change in the cannabis flower supplier, writes Business of Cannabis.

During a recent parliamentary session, Pirate Party MP Sven Clement asked Health Minister Paulette Lenert about the situation, highlighting that only marijuana oils are accessible at the moment. Lenert explained that the shortage is due to a change of suppliers. The contract with the previous supplier, Canadian cannabis giant Tilray Brands Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) ended in August and the May tender was won by a Danish pharmaceutical company Schroll Medical.

While the regulators in charge of the MMJ program made a huger order in July to avoid shortage during the transition between suppliers, the order wasn’t completed.

“The order has not arrived and the new cannabis supplier also needs some time before it can supply a sufficient quantity. The cannabis flowers are produced specifically for the Luxembourg market,” Lenert said. She added that the next supply is expected at the end of October and in November.

Malta: Controversial Cannabis Post Was A ‘Mistake By The Management’

Andrew Cassar Overend, a government employee and head of Sprawt Chra, one of the two cannabis associations to obtain an “in-principle” license in Malta, said a recent advertising incident was “a mistake by the management,” reports the Shift News. 

In the controversial post, Sprawt invited people to join a “weed-loving journey” with “sizzling events, blazing giveaways, and pot-tastic surprises.” The post and Sprawt's entire Facebook page were deleted most likely due to the violation of advertising rules. 

Under Malta’s cannabis law, only “cannabis harm reduction associations” are licensed and regulated to grow and sell cannabis. These associations must be non-profit, can only sell their product and are not allowed to advertise, put cannabis in the name or promote marijuana use in any way. 

“The post you refer to was unauthorized by the association’s management team, and an internal exercise is underway to prevent future repeats,” Cassar Overend, who works at the National Development and Social Fund and was previously an economics officer ...

Full story available on Benzinga.com


Disclaimer: The views, recommendations, and opinions expressed in this content belong solely to the third-party experts. This site was not involved in the writing and production of this article.


Disclaimer Press Release Banner